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Why Nigerians Must Embrace Restructuring Now – Ben Bruce

Why Nigerians Must Embrace Restructuring Now – Ben Bruce

by | 8th August 2017
Ben Murray-Bruce.

Senator of the Federal Republic, Ben Murray-Bruce, representing Bayelsa East has thrown his weight behind the calls for restructuring of the Federal structure.

 

He made his position known via his popular “Common Sense” advocacy, saying Nigeria must look beyond oil economy and venture into other sector to grow the country.

 

He said, “We either restructure Nigeria now or we go bankrupt in 20 years’ time because our major source of income which is oil will no more be relevant as petrol and diesel cars will be faced out in the nearest future.”

 

He gave the example of the French president Emmanuel Macron who has announced that petrol and diesel cars will be illegal to manufacture or driven in France by 2040.

 

As a result of what Ben Murray Bruce predicted some years back, it is important for us to ask ourselves some important questions like:

 

What becomes the faith of Nigeria as it continues to depend solely on oil?

What happens to Nigeria’s oil when all vehicles become electric by 2025?

What happens to Nigeria’s economy which has been dependent on oil for decades?

 

This is to show that the days of oil are going gradually.

 

What are the ways we can apply “Common Sense” to restructure Nigeria without depending on oil?

 

Common sense should tell us that, Nigeria’s wealth is in its human resources and not mineral resources.

 

We need to trial the footsteps of DR. Wale Adenuga, and Atiku Abubakar who have all shown us that we can do without oil in Nigeria, through their industrial ideas of maximizing human capacity and creating employment and maximizing human capacity.

 

If Lagos, the largest economy in Africa can survive without oil, then Nigeria can survive without oil. All we need is good leadership because it is good leadership that has made Lagos rich not oil.

 

It will make sense if we have a new Nigeria built on social justice, equity, and merit or face a bleak future without oil.